Third Issue on IEEE Xplore

Check out our latest issue out on IEEE Xplore. We have 5 great features for your reading pleasure:

  • DNA-Based Storage: Trends and Methods
  • Molecular Sensing and Computing Systems
  • Dynamic Modeling of Antimicrobial Pore Formation in Engineered Tethered Membranes
  • Information Rates of ASK-Based Molecular Communication in Fluid Media
  • Open-Loop Power Adaptation in Nanosensor Networks for Chemical Reactors

As always, we are looking for more manuscripts that fit into our subject area and scope. Submit through our ScholarOne Manuscript Central portal.

Call For Papers – Special Issue on Biological Applications of Information Theory – Claude Shannon’s Centennial

In honor of Claude Shannon’s centennial:

We are pleased to announce a

Special issue of the IEEE Transactions on Molecular, Biological, and Multi-Scale Communications

on

Biological Applications of Information Theory

 

Submission deadline June 1, 2016

 

Claude Shannon, born April 30, 1916, pioneered the mathematical theory of communication in his 1948 paper in the Bell System Technical Journal.  Information theory has since provided the foundation for the digital revolution in communications technology.  In addition, it has provided a powerful framework for investigating the fundamental limitations of naturally occurring communications, particularly in biological systems. Early applications included consideration of redundancy reduction in sensory pathways (Attneave 1954, Barlow 1961), ionizing radiation and mutagenesis (Yockey 1958), efficiency of metabolic processes (Johnson and Knudsen 1965), and analysis of reliable computation in the presence of noise (Cowan and Winograd 1963).

Modern developments have accelerated in recent years as a result of advances in MEMS/NEMS and systems biology, the emergence of synthetic bacteria and lab/process-on-a-chip techniques, and collection of large data sets in both electrophysiology and cell biology.  It is now possible to design chemical “circuits”, custom organisms, micro/nanoscale swarms of devices, and a host of other new systems at small length scales, and across multiple scales (e.g., micro to macro). This success opens up a new frontier for interdisciplinary communications techniques using chemistry, biology, and other principles that have not been considered in the communications literature, as well as creating new ways of understanding the principles underlying communication in biological systems at many scales.

The special issue will celebrate Shannon’s centennial by highlighting success stories and current progress in biological and bio-inspired information theory.  In particular, we hereby solicit both invited and submitted papers in three interrelated areas:

    1.     1. Information theory and cellular/molecular biology/biochemistry (including information theory and intercellular communication);

 

    1.     2. Information theory and neuroscience; and

 

    1.     3. Information-theoretic analysis of biologically inspired communication systems (including nanonetworking and design of biologically implemented information processing networks).

 

Contributions from researchers beyond the IEEE’s typical audience are encouraged.

 

Submission Instructions

Submissions will be collected via Manuscript Central, http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/tmbmc/ .

In your cover letter, state: “This paper is a submission for the Shannon Centennial special issue”.  For further information, please contact the corresponding guest editor, Prof. Peter Thomas (pjthomas__at__case.edu).

 

Special Issue Guest Editors

 

Prof. Alexander G. Dimitrov

Department of Mathematics and Statistics                                             

Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience

Washington State University, Vancouver, Washington, USA               

 

Prof. Faramarz Fekri

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

 

Prof. Aurel Lazar

Department of Electrical Engineering

Columbia University, New York, New York, USA

 

Prof. Stefan M. Moser

Signal and Information Processing Lab (ISI)

ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

National Chiao Tung University (NCTU), Hsinchu, Taiwan

 

Prof. Peter J. Thomas*

Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, and Statistics

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Department of Biology

Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

 

*corresponding guest editor

IEEE ICC 2017– Molecular, Biological, and Multi-Scale Communications Area

The IEEE International Conference on Communications (ICC) 2017 will be taking place at the Palais des Congrès in Paris from May 21 through May 25, 2017. Our Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Molecular, Biological, and Multi-Scale Communications, Dr. Urbashi Mitra, will be heading up the Molecular, Biological, and Multi-Scale Communications area. Paper submissions are due by October 14, 2016. For more information on ICC 2017, please see http://icc2017.ieee-icc.org or check out the Call for Papers and Proposals. Stay tuned! More information to come.

Call for Papers – IEEE Globecom 2016 – Selected Areas in Communications Track

CALL FOR PAPERS
Selected Areas in Communications track – Molecular, Biological, and Multi-Scale Communications
IEEE Globecom 2016 – December 4-8, 2016, Washington, DC, USA

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: April 1, 2016
For more information please see: http://globecom2016.ieee-globecom.org/

As a result of recent advances in MEMS/NEMS and systems biology, as well as the emergence of synthetic bacteria and lab/process-on-a-chip techniques, it is now possible to design chemical “circuits”, custom organisms, micro/nanoscale swarms of devices, and a host of other new systems at small length scales, and across multiple scales (e.g., micro to macro). This success opens up a new frontier for interdisciplinary signaling techniques using chemistry, biology, novel electron transfer, and other principles not previously examined. This track is devoted to the principles, design, and analysis of signaling and information systems that use physics beyond conventional electromagnetism, particularly for small-scale and multi-scale applications. This includes: molecular, quantum, and other physical, chemical and biological (and biologically-inspired) techniques; as well as new signaling techniques at these scales. As the boundaries between communication, sensing and control are blurred in these novel signaling systems, research contributions in a diversity of disciplines are invited.

Original research articles are solicited in, but not limited to, the following areas:
– mathematical modeling of biological, molecular or multi-scale communication
-channel model design and analysis
– molecular computing
– DNA sequencing
– biological, molecular or multi-scale networking
– implementations and laboratory experiments
– systems biology
– data-starved or data-rich statistical analyses of biological systems
– industrial applications
– biological circuits
– biosystems analysis and control
– information/communication theory for analysis of biological systems
– unconventional electromagnetism for small or multi-scale applications
– experiment-based studies on information processes or networks in biology

Papers in related areas will also be considered for publication.

MBMC Workshop Almost Here

A couple more days until the workshop! It will be taking place at the University of Southern California at the Hughes Aircraft Electrical Engineering Building (EEB) 132.
 
Please take a look at all the great talks coming up, as well as all the posters to be displayed. We will even be having lightning poster presentations. Check out the entire program over the two days of the workshop.
 

The Parking and Directions page will give you all the details on how to find us.

 

 

Walking from Parking Structure A:
-Turn right on McClintock Ave
-EEB is at the intersection of McClintock Ave. and West 37th Place

 

Walking from the Radisson hotel:
-Cross Figueroa Street
-Enter on Childs Way. Keep walking down Childs Way.
-Turn Left onto Watt Way
-Either enter onto the small path in front of Powell Hall and walk all the way down OR turn Right onto West 37th Place
-EEB is on the intersection of McClintock Ave and West 37th Place

 

See you there!